Climate & Ocean


Mining climate clues from our whaling past

Climate scientists work with historians to tap weather records from old New England whaling logbooks. They hope to leverage the historical data to gain new insights into modern-day climate conditions.

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Knee-Deep

WHOI engineer Chris Basque deploys instruments for the Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) Global Array as waves crash board the R/V Nathaniel B.…

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Study Finds No Direct Link Between North Atlantic Ocean Currents, Sea Level Along New England Coast

A new study by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) clarifies what influence major currents in the North Atlantic have on sea level along the northeastern United States. The study, published June 13 in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, examined both the strength of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC)—a conveyor belt of currents that move warmer waters north and cooler waters south in the Atlantic—and historical records of sea level in coastal New England.

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On Top of the World

A helicopter takes off with a sling-load of freshly-drilled ice cores taken from the 2000-meter-high summit of an ice cap in west Greenland.

A helicopter takes off with a sling-load of freshly-drilled ice cores taken from the 2000-meter-high summit of an ice cap…

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Corals in the Red Sea Offer Long-term View of South Asian Monsoon

Using chemical data from corals in the Red Sea, WHOI scientists reconstructed nearly three centuries of wind data that provided a definitive, natural record of the monsoon’s intensity. The finding, published online March 28 in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, show that monsoon winds have indeed increased over the past centuries.

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