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Sea Level Rise


Woods Hole Organizations Consider Impact Of Sea Level Rise

Falmouth Enterprise
Falmouth Enterprise

WHOI, the Northeast Fisheries Science Center and National Marine Fisheries Services presented the Woods Hole village climate change vulnerability assessment and action plan to the Falmouth Select Board on Monday, November 23.

Boston Dance Theater performs SURGE at Ocean Encounters

Watch Boston Dance Theater (BDT) perform their current art and science project called SURGE which is an ongoing collaboration between BDT and WHOI Senior Scientist, Dr. Larry J. Pratt. SURGE addresses current climate trends through the lens of sea-level rise and the role that art and science play in creating a sustainable future. This performance took place during WHOI’s 2020 Ocean Encounters finale episode entitled Our Enchanted Ocean and was recorded on October 28, 2020.

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Rising Tides: preparing for the future

Like many coastal communities, Woods Hole, located on Cape Cod, faces an uncertain future. Rising sea level and the potential for increased frequency and intensity of storms present significant long-term threats. Woods Hole is home to world-leading marine science institutions performing critical research from shore-based facilities that enable access to the sea and yet, ironically, are vulnerable to the same climate change impacts that are the subject of study.

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For now, river deltas gain land worldwide

Delta areas worldwide have gained land in the past 30 years, despite river damming. However, recent land gains are unlikely to last throughout the 21st century due to expected, accelerated sea-level rise.

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WHOI scientists weigh in on sea level rise impact study

Climate Central sea level rise graphic

When it comes to future sea level rise, most studies predict we’ll see between four to eight inches of global sea level rise between now and 2050. The looming question is—how many people will be affected by rising seas in the coming decades?

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More Than 11,000 International Scientists Declare Climate Emergency

WCAI

A new paper endorsed by 11,258 scientists and researchers from 153 countries describes climate change as a “climate emergency.” Published in the journal BioScience, it warns of “untold human suffering” if individuals, governments, and businesses don’t make deep and lasting changes.

Impacts of climate change on the ocean

Living Lab Radio, WCAI

Rick Murray of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution sees the impacts of climate change on the ocean and the ability of ocean-based activities to mitigate climate change as two sides of the same coin, and says both are critical to responding to climate change. (segment begins at 27:10)

New report takes in-depth look at three factors contributing to sea level rise along the U.S. East Coast

Phys.org

A new report from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) discusses some of the science of sea level rise and highlights three key processes that contribute to the phenomenon. Produced in conjunction with climate science expert Dr. Christopher Piecuch, the report also describes some of the research being conducted to better understand how and why sea levels are rising, so that we can more confidently predict future changes.

Three things you may not know about sea level rise

Since the turn of the 20th century, seas have risen six to eight inches globally. New technologies, along with a better understanding of how the oceans, ice sheets, and other components of climate interact, have helped scientists identify the factors that contribute to sea level rise.

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New Sea Level Rise report

This new WHOI report provides an in-depth look at three factors contributing to sea level rise along the U.S. East Coast, and how scientists are studying the phenomenon. Learn how new technologies, along with a better understanding of how the oceans, ice sheets, and other components of climate interact, have helped scientists identify these factors.

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Study Finds No Direct Link Between North Atlantic Ocean Currents, Sea Level Along New England Coast

A new study by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) clarifies what influence major currents in the North Atlantic have on sea level along the northeastern United States. The study, published June 13 in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, examined both the strength of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC)—a conveyor belt of currents that move warmer waters north and cooler waters south in the Atlantic—and historical records of sea level in coastal New England.

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