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Images: What Does It Take To Break a Whale?

Graduate student Regina Campbell-Malone put a 493-pound, 14-foot whale jawbone through a series of stress tests to develop recommendations for vessel speeds aimed at preventing vessel-whale collisions. (Photo by Tom Kleindinst, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)
WHOI biologist Michael Moore (red jacket) and David Taylor, a WHOI Guest Investigator, prepared to perform a necropsy on a right whale named Stumpy, who washed ashore near Nags Head, N.C., in 2004. Stumpy's jawbone was used for the bulk of Regina Campbell-Malone's research on the amount of stress a whale bone can sustain before it breaks. (Photo by Regina Campbell-Malone, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)
Regina Campbell-Malone taught a marine biology class in 2005 for students at Codman Academy Charter School in Dorchester, Mass., bringing them to Cape Cod for a day of fieldwork at Waquoit Bay and a shark dissection at WHOI's Marine Research Facility. (Photo by Kate Madin, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)
Regina Campbell-Malone (left) and radiologic technologist Julie Arruda prepare the whale's jawbone for a computed tomography (CT) scan. These images revealthe bone's internal structure, pathology, and possible fractures. (Photo by Tom Kleindinst, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)
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