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Images: An Ocean Instrument Is Born

WHOI microbiologist Craig Taylor recently celebrated his 40th year at WHOI. He has devoted much of his career to developing robotic instruments to collect, incubate, and preserve plankton and microbes at ocean depths from near the surface to more than two miles down. (Photo by Cherie Winner, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

Deep-SID is on its way into the Mediterranean, aided by postdoctoral investigator Maria Pachiadaki and SSSG Allison Heater. Before deployment, researchers loaded the top half of each clear vertical sample tube with a yellow fixative. The instrument will collect water samples and mix them with the fixative, preserving any organisms in the samples. (Photo by Cherie Winner, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

When Deep-SID returned from deployment, the yellow fixative was seen throughout the sample tubes. Any microbes in the collected water would have been preserved for laboratory analysis. (Photo by Cherie Winner, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

The polycarbonate intake port on MS-SID was designed to minimize turbulence at the point where water is drawn into the instrument. That feature is crucial for use in areas, such as Deep Hypersaline Anoxic Basins, where salinity and chemical composition of the water change dramatically over short distances. (Photo by Cherie Winner, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

A technician carefully removes the filter from a Filtration Filter II (FFII) unit that had been installed on MS-SID for collecting microbes in the eastern Mediterranean. In the FFII, sample water flowed down through the filter, which trapped any cells. The FFI then immediately flooded the cells with a preservative. (Photo by Cherie Winner, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)