NOSAMS NEWS

News Articles featuring NOSAMS clients and Students

Arctic amplification of global warming strengthened by sunlight oxidation of permafrost carbon to CO2

Currently, scientists estimate that 5-15% of the carbon stored in surface permafrost soils could be emitted as the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide by 2100, given the current trajectory of global warming. This emission, spurred by microbial action, could lead to 0.3 to 0.4 degrees Celsius of additional global warming.But this estimation is missing a crucial path that carbon dioxide may be entering the atmosphere: sunlight.

Check out former NOSAMS intern, Jenny Bowen's work: Arctic amplification of global warming strengthened by sunlight oxidation of permafrost carbon to CO2.

"Efficient preservation of young terrestrial organic carbon in sandy turbidity-current deposits"

Sophie Hage is a postgraduate research student studying Sedimentology within Ocean and Earth Science in the National Oceanography Centre at the Southampton at the University of Southampton.  From March to June in 2018 she was a guest student here at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution working with Dr. Valier Galy.  While here at WHOI working with Dr. Galy, she spent a lot of her time here at NOSAMS on the Ramped Pyrolysis and Oxidation (RPO) system.

Her recent work includes the work she did at a guest student at NOSAMS and WHOI,  “Efficient preservation of young terrestrial organic carbon in sandy turbidity-current deposits”

Ramped thermal analysis for isolating biologically meaningful soil organic matter fractions with distinct residence times

Jon Sanderman visited the lab in 2019 to use the RPO on a series of soil profiles sampled decadally since the 1960’s. Did you know that the RPO was originally called the dirt burner? His paper is now out: Ramped thermal analysis for isolating biologically meaningful soil organic matter fractions with distinct residence times

Life history of northern Gulf of Mexico Warsaw grouper Hyporthodus nigritus inferred from otolith radiocarbon analysis

Beverly Barnett a graduate student at the University of Florida came to NOSAMS a graduate student intership.  She analyzed radiocarbon in chronological layers of fish otoliths and eye lenses to develop natural, permanent biogeochemical markers of petrocarbon in the northern Gulf of Mexico food web following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

A late Holocene subfossil Atlantic white cedar tree-ring chronology from the northeastern United States

Jessie Pearl worked with NOSAMS to do help develop reconnaissance radiocarbon dating- a method to get quick radiocarbon results at a lower cost and at a reduced precision- for organic carbon samples.  She finished her PhD at the University of Arizona and her work on the Atlantic white cedar, A late Holocene subfossil Atlantic white cedar tree-ring chronology from the northeastern United States, is now published. 

Why did an entire civilization vanish?

Four thousand years ago, the Harappan civilisation thrived in what is now modern-day Pakistan. By 1800 BC their cities were abandoned. Now a team of scientists think they have discovered where they went. Look for highlight from NOSAMS.

Old Nuclear Fallout Proves Useful for Sea Turtle Clues

Dr. Kyle Van Houtan turns to an unlikely environmental marker to better understand the life of the world’s seven marine turtle species, all but one of which are endangered.

A Survivor Comes Home

Dr. Paul Aharon and Dr. Steven Jacobs use radiocarbon dating to investigate how old a Torah rescued from the Nazis in the Czech regions of Bohemia and Moravia might be.

Specks in the Spectrometer

An atomic odyssey from the Great Calcite Belt to a data point by Sarah Rosengard and WHOI/MIT Joint Program student.

Is the 'Gospel of Jesus's Wife' a revelation or a hoax?

Harvard University professor Karen L. King with Noreen Tuross investigate a a tiny fragment of ancient Egyptian papyrus whose eight partial lines of Coptic script included one sensational half-sentence: “Jesus said to them, ‘My wife . . .’ ”

Earth's Riverine Bloodstream

MIT/WHOI joint program student Jordan Hemingway unlocks clues to how our planet works by studying rivers.

River Buries Permafrost Carbon at Sea

NOSAMS Client Valier Galy's new study tracing the fate of carbon stored in thawing Arctic soils.

Monster hurricanes reached U.S. during prehistoric periods of ocean warming

A new study by NOSAMS' clients Jeff Donnelly and Andrea Hawkes of prehistoric hurricanes shows the intensity and frequency of hurricanes the U.S. could experience could intensify as ocean temperatures increase with climate change.

New study finds extreme longevity in white sharks

MIT/WHOI joint program student Li Ling Hamady student uses radiocarbon dating to show Great White sharks grow much slower and live significantly longer than previously thought.

Great white sharks—top predators throughout the world's ocean—grow much slower and live significantly longer than previously thought, according to a new study

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-01-extreme-longevity-white-sharks.html#jCp
Great white sharks—top predators throughout the world's ocean—grow much slower and live significantly longer than previously thought, according to a new study

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-01-extreme-longevity-white-sharks.html#jCp
Great white sharks—top predators throughout the world's ocean—grow much slower and live significantly longer than previously thought, according to a new study

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-01-extreme-longevity-white-sharks.html#jCp
Great white sharks—top predators throughout the world's ocean—grow much slower and live significantly longer than previously thought, according to a new study

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-01-extreme-longevity-white-sharks.html#jCp

What is That Sticking Out of the Sand?

Christopher Maio and Greg Berman, with a little help from NOSAMS, investigate drowned forests around Cape Cod.

Tracking Carbon in the Arctic Ocean

David Griffith, with support from NOSAMS, conducts a study to measure carbon at various depths in the Artic Ocean.

Scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) have conducted a new study to measure levels of carbon at various depths in the Arctic Ocean. - See more at: http://www.astrobio.net/topic/solar-system/earth/climate/tracking-carbon-in-the-arctic-ocean/#sthash.4HLSeU9b.dpuf

David Griffith
David Griffith
David Griffith

NOSAMS Staff Publications

NOSAMS Research Library

The NOSAMS Research Library is a searchable directory of publications written by NOSAMS staff and clients.