R/V Neil Armstrong Construction

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Susan K. Avery, president and director of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, welds her initials into a piece of steel at the  keel authentication ceremony of the then-unnamed AGOR-27 research vessel as Rear Adm. Matthew Klunder, Chief of Naval Research, looks on. AGOR ships are modern oceanographic research platforms capable of satisfying a wide range of research activities in oceanographic research. The ship will join the U.S. Academic research fleet in 2015, supporting critical research throughout the world's oceans. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Joan E. Jennings)
The initials of Rear Adm. Matthew Klunder, Chief of Naval Research, and Susan K. Avery, president and director of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, authenticate the keel of AGOR-27, later named R/V Neil Armstrong. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Joan E. Jennings)
Assembly begins in September 2012 on the first block—eventually part of the engine room—of R/V Neil Armstrong in Anacortes, Wash., at the Dakota Creek Industries shipyard. (Photo by Gary McGrath, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)
A section of R/V Neil Armstrong's keel awaits finishing. (Photo by Gary McGrath, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)
A section of partially completed keel for R/V Neil Armstrong is flipped prior to being attached to the already completed blocks of the ship. (Photo by Gary McGrath, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)
Blocks 3 and 4 (the eventual engine room) of R/V Neil Armstrong are attached in the shipyard of Dakota Creek Industries in Anacortes, Wash., in 2012. (Photo by Gary McGrath, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)
Completed blocks of R/V Neil Armstrong (left) and R/V Sally Ride side-by-side in the Dakota Creek Industries shipyard in Anacortes, Wash. (Photo by Gary McGrath, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)
One of R/V Neil Armstrong's main engines, a Cummins QSK38, is installed into block 4 of the ship in October 2012. (Photo by Gary McGrath, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)
The stern A-frame of R/V Neil Armstrong undergoes load-bearing tests in 2013. (Photo by Gary McGrath, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

The R/V Neil Armstrong bow section is lifted into place before being attached in 2013.

(Photo by Gary McGrath, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)
Partially completed sections of R/V Neil Armstrong (left) and R/V Sally Ride sit side-by-side in the shipyard of Dakota Creek Industries in 2013. (Photo by Gary McGrath, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)
R/V Neil Armstrong's completed pilothouse is moved its assembly bay to the ship in 2013. (Photo by Gary McGrath, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)
The pilothouse for R/V Neil Armstrong is hoisted into place. (Photo by Gary McGrath, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)
A team of engineers and current WHOI ship crew gathered in the mock up of R/V Armstrong pilothouse in 2013 to review placement of instruments and controls. (Photo by Gary McGrath, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)
In October 2013, R/V Neil Armstrong received its name. (Photo by Gary McGrath, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)
The freshly primed R/V Neil Armstrong awaits its final colors. (Photo by Gary McGrath, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)
R/V Neil Armstrong (right) sits next to its sister ship, R/V Sally Ride in the Dakota Creek Industries shipyard in Anacortes, Wash., in 2013. (Photo by Gary McGrath, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)
The freshly painted R/V Neil Armstrong. (Photo by Gary McGrath, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)
Stern transom of the freshly painted R/V Neil Armstrong. The ship's propellers are variable-pitch to help it maintain position in wind and waves. (Photo by Gary McGrath, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)
R/V Neil Armstrong (right) waits to be launched next to its sister ship, R/V Sally Ride in late 2013. (Photo by Gary McGrath, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)
On the morning of February 20, 2013, R/V Neil Armstrong was slowly lowered into the water at Dakota Creek Industries shipyard over the course of several hours. Yard workers took advantage of a neap tide, in which the difference between high and low water is at a minimum, in order to reduce the effect of currents on the ship during the operation. (Photo by Gary McGrath, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

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