Chemosynthetic Habitats

chimney

Lost City carbonate chimney.

Macrofaunal Characterization of Peridotite-Hosted Ecosystems
Associated with the Lost City Hydrothermal Field
Buckman and Shank


In 2001, an off-axis peridotite-hosted hydrothermal system supporting up to 60 meter tall carbonate-brucite chimneys was discovered on the Atlantis Massif (30°07.4'N, 42°07.24'W; 700-800m depth). In 2003, a second interdisciplinary expedition returned to this site, the Lost City Hydrothermal Vent Field (LCHF), to understand the linkages among hydrothermal alteration of the mantle, geochemistry, and biological ecosystems within this environment. Read more...

Rimicaris exoculata

Rimicaris exoculata- Juveniles

(orange/red and adults (gray)).

Geographic and Temporal Genetic Structure
Within Rimicaris exoculata Along the Northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge
Peohls and Shank


Genetic communication between disjunct communities of hydrothermal vent shrimp, Rimicaris exoculata, on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) was investigated using sequence data from the mitochondrial cytochrome b (cyt b). Read more...

Map of study locations

Map of study locations: Rainbow (yellow),

Snake Pit (purple), Kairei (blue).

Hydrothermal Vent-Endemic Shrimp Episymbiont Diversity and Distribution on the Mid-Atlantic and Central Indian Ridges
Knee, McKiness, Cavanaugh, and Shank

The discovery of a diverse collection of Mid-Atlantic Ridge shrimp epibionts may yield novel insights into the ecology of symbiotic bacterial assemblages and their cospeciation with metazoan hosts found at hydrothermal vents. Read more...

This picture taken from Alvin shows

basalt panels placed around a

chemical sensor (blue T-Bar handle)

deployed into a Riftia patch.

Exploring integrative approaches to understand the interaction of microbial biofilms and fluid chemistry on larval settlement at deep-sea hydrothermal vents
Beaulieu, Shank & Sievert

The discovery of a diverse collection of Mid-Atlantic Ridge shrimp epibionts may yield novel insights into the ecology of symbiotic bacterial assemblages and their cospeciation with metazoan hosts found at hydrothermal vents. Read more...

exclusion experiment

The exclusion experiment on the

East Pacific Rise. Photo taken from

a digital time lapse camera system,

April 2004.

Integrated Studies of Biological Community Structure at Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vents
Shank & Beaulieu

We are assessing, through an integrated program, the factors responsible for biological community structure at hydrothermal vents in the area between 9°49.61’ and 9°50.36’N (known as the Biologic-Geologic Transect) along the crest of the East Pacific Rise (EPR). Read more...

p_dispersal.htm

Location of CTD stations (circles)

within the segments (enumerated)

taken during a SMAR cruise (PI Chris

German) in October 2001) between

the Chain and Boca Verde FZs.

Dispersal Boundaries and Species Composition of Hydrothermal Ecosystems on the Southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge
To What Extent do the Equatorial Atlantic Fracture Zones Impact the Dispersion, Biogeography and Evolution of Vent-Endemic Fauna?
Shank


The tight coupling between geological processes and living organisms at hydrothermal vents provides a singular opportunity to study how fundamental planetary processes shape the evolution of life. These tightly linked geological-biological systems have yielded a global network of extraordinarily productive chemosynthetic communities. Read more...

Calyfied Vent Site

Calyfied Vent Site, showing the

abundant vesicomyid clams and

patches of grey sponge.

New Species of Hydrothermal Vent Sponge from the Galapagos Rift
Waller, Buckman, Shank and Pomponi

Deep-sea hydrothermal vents were first discovered on the Galapagos Rift at 86°W in 1977. A NOAA Ocean Exploration Program expedition in May-June 2002, utilizing the RV Atlantis and DSV Alvin, was the first expedition to the area since 1990. A large clam field, named Calyfield, was discovered along the rift during this cruise. It is the most westerly of the known active vent sites on the Galapagos Rift. Read more...