Cruise Slide Show

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The Ocean Drilling Program drillship JOIDES Resolution (Photo courtesy of the Ocean Drilling Program)
Technicians prepare to cut a sediment just brought up from the ocean floor. (Photo courtesy of the Ocean Drilling Program)
Photomicrograph of the planktonic foraminifer Heterohelix collected from Cretaceous sediments on Demerara Rise, tropical North Atlantic. (Richard D. Norris at Scripps Institution of Oceanography )
Map showing what the Earth might have looked like about 94 million years ago. The location of the study area is indicated by the solid box. (Courtesy of Christopher R. Scotese, University of Texas)
Splitting a sediment core at sea into a working half and an archive half. (Photo courtesy of the Ocean Drilling Program)
Images of cores from different sampling locations on the Demerara Rise, indicated by the box on the map. (Courtesy of the Ocean Drilling Program)
Sedimentologists begin to describe cores collected while still at sea. (Photo courtesy of the Ocean Drilling Program)
Karen Bice studies microfossils from a core under a microscope. (Photo courtesy of Richard D. Norris, Scripps Institution of Oceanography)
A scanning electron micropscope image of forams from Site 144 on the Demerara Rise. Foraminifera, or formans, are tiny single-celled organisms that construct shells found in sediments dating back millions of years. (Photo courtesy of Richard D. Norris, Scripps Institution of Oceanography)
Photomicrograph of the planktonic foraminifer Marginotruncana sinuosa, Whiteinella inornata and Heterohelix globulosa collected from Cretaceous sediments on Demerara Rise, tropical North Atlantic. Reflected light (left) and scanning electron microscope (right) images are shown. Bar scale is 100 microns. (Image courtesy Andre Bornemann and Richard Norris, Scripps Institution of Oceanography)

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