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News Releases

1-20 of 113 results

Corals Die as Global Warming Collides with Local Weather in the South China Sea

New research highlights the devastation caused when global-scale ocean warming interacts with short-lived weather anomalies, and adds urgency to the question of how reefs will fare through the end of this century. 

A New Long-Term Ecological Research Site Announced for the Northeast U.S. Shelf

To better understand and manage the intricate ecosystem off the Northeast U.S. coast, the National Science Foundation has announced the selection of this critical ocean region for a new Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site led by WHOI.

Panel to Discuss Deep-Sea Mining at AAAS Meeting

Home to an immense diversity of marine life, the deep ocean also contains valuable minerals with metals such as nickel, copper, cobalt, manganese, zinc, and gold, and rare-earth elements used in electronic technology like smart phones and medical imaging machines. As demand for these resources increases and supplies on land decrease, commercial mining operators are looking to the deep ocean as the next frontier for mining.

Some Fish Quickly Adapt to Lethal Levels of Pollution

Killifish living in four polluted East Coast estuaries have adapted to survive levels of toxic industrial pollutants that would normally kill them, tolerating concentrations up to 8,000 times higher than sensitive fish. A new study reveals the complex genetic basis for the Atlantic killifish’s remarkable resilience.

New Studies Take a Second Look at Coral Bleaching Culprit

A new study from WHOI indicates that superoxide—a natural toxin believed to be the main culprit behind coral bleaching—may actually play a beneficial role in coral health and resilience.

WHOI Scientist Receives Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation Award

The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation selected Mak Saito, a biogeochemist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), as one of eight awardees of a 2016 Postdoctoral Program in Environmental Chemistry grant. 

New 13-year Study Tracks Impact of Changing Climate on a Key Marine Food Source

A new multiyear study from scientists at WHOI has shown for the first time how changes in ocean temperature affect a key species of phytoplankton.

Study Reveals Corals' Influence on Reef Microbes

In novel lab observations of interactions between corals and planktonic bacteria, known as picoplankton, researchers found that corals are selectively feeding on specific types of bacteria—the same bacteria whose growth is promoted by organic matter and nutrients that are released by the corals.

Scientists Now Listening for Whales in New York Waters With Real-time Acoustic Buoy

Scientists working for WCS’s (Wildlife Conservation Society) New York Aquarium and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) now have an "ear" for the New York region’s biggest "voices and singers"— the whales of New York Bight.

Swansea University Professor Receives Prestigious Fulbright Award to Study at WHOI

David Lamb, a professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Swansea University in Wales, will conduct research at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) as part of an All Disciplines Scholar Fulbright Award—one of the most prestigious and selective scholarship programs operating worldwide.

SharkCam Tracks Great Whites into the Deep

On the first trip to study great white sharks in the wild off Guadalupe Island in 2013, the REMUS SharkCam team returned with an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) tattooed with bite marks and some of the most dramatic footage ever seen on Discovery Channel's Shark Week: large great white sharks attacking the underwater robot, revealing previously unknown details about strategies sharks use to hunt and interact with their prey.

Swarming Red Crabs Documented on Video

A research team studying biodiversity at the Hannibal Bank Seamount off the coast of Panama has captured unique video of thousands of red crabs swarming in low-oxygen waters just above the seafloor. 

Robotic Vehicles Offer a New Tool in Study of Shark Behavior

THe REMUS SharkCam has enabled groundbreaking scientific understanding of great white sharks.

Amy Apprill Featured in Science's Video Series

Amy Apprill, a microbiologist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), is one of the extraordinary women scientists featured in Science Magazine's online video series, "XX Files: Extraordinary Science, Extraordinary Women."

Drag from Fishing Gear Entanglements Quantified

A research team studying entangled North Atlantic Right Whales has for the first time quantified the amount of drag created by towed fishing gear.

New Study Provides First Field Observations of Rare Omura's Whales

An international team of biologists has made the first-ever field observations of one of the least known species of whales in the world—Omura's whales—off the coast of Madagascar.

Novel Tag Developed for Squid, Jellyfish

Invertebrates, such as squid and jellyfish, play a crucial role in the marine food web and are also vital commercial fisheries. Despite their importance, little is known about their natural behaviors or how their environment influences those behaviors or physiology. A new data-logging tag, called the ITAG, developed specifically for small and delicate invertebrates not only quantifies ocean conditions but also measures animals’ responses to their physical environments in high resolution.

Climate Change Will Irreversibly Force Key Ocean Bacteria into Overdrive

Scientists demonstrate that a key organism in the ocean’s food web will start reproducing at high speed as carbon dioxide levels rise, with no way to stop when nutrients become scarce.

WHOI, NEAQ Embark on Expedition to the Phoenix Islands

A research team led by the New England Aquarium (NEAQ) and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) are heading out on a 6,000-mile expedition to one of the most remote places on Earth—the Phoenix Islands in the central Pacific Ocean. Throughout the month of September and in the midst of a strengthening Pacific El Nino, researchers will investigate the combined effects of climate change and human activity on the these vast coral reef ecosystems and the diversity of life they sustain. 

Evidence of Ancient Life Discovered in Mantle Rocks Deep Below the Seafloor

Ancient rocks harbored microbial life deep below the seafloor, reports a team of scientists, confirming a long-standing hypothesis that interactions between mantle rocks and seawater can create potential for life even in hard rocks deep below the ocean floor.

1-20 of 113 results