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News Releases

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Deep-Sea Images Give New View of Arctic Ocean Methane Seeps

WHOI scientists and colleagues from the Centre for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Environment and Climate in Norway collected nearly 30,000 high definition images at known methane release sites in the Arctic Ocean. The detailed images will provide new insights into the most remote areas of natural methane releases in the world.

New Museum Exhibit Explores Deep Ocean Environment

In collaboration with the Ocean Explorium in New Bedford, WHOI has created new digital content for museum-based spherical display systems that brings high-definition images and video of dynamic, deep ocean ecosystems to the public.

Online Science Expedition Brings Deep Sea Vents to the Computer Screen

Scientists and engineers using advanced technology and a unique robotic vehicle to study the deep sea will also be using their computers to interact with students, teachers, and the public about the research they are conducting.

WHOI Researchers, Collaborators Receive $1.4 Million to Study Life in Ocean's Greatest Depths

Scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), University of Hawaii, Whitman College and international colleagues will conduct the first systematic study of life in the deepest marine habitat on Earth—ocean trenches.

NSF Announces Major Awards for Biodiversity Research, WHOI Scientists Selected

A WHOI-led project is one of several major awards recently announced by the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Dimensions in Biodiversity research program. The multi-disciplinary, international collaborative effort will advance our understanding of deep-sea hydrothermal vent microbial communities and their global impact.

Expedition to Mid-Cayman Rise Identifies Unusual Variety of Deep Sea Vents

The first expedition to search for deep-sea hydrothermal vents along the Mid-Cayman Rise has turned up three distinct types of hydrothermal venting, an interdisciplinary team led by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) reports in this week’s Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The work was conducted as part of a NASA-funded effort to search extreme environments for geologic, biologic, and chemical clues to the origins and evolution of life.

Long-Distance Larvae Speed to New Undersea Vent Homes

Working in a rare, “natural seafloor laboratory” of hydrothermal vents that had just been rocked by a volcanic eruption, scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and other institutions have discovered what they believe is an undersea superhighway carrying tiny life forms unprecedented distances to inhabit the post-eruption site.

Seafloor bacteria are multi-tasking with the carbon cycle

Scientists have long known that microorganisms can use one of two different methods to convert carbon dioxide into a form that living things can use for energy. What they didn’t know until recently is that at least one form of bacteria can switch between these two “carbon fixation” pathways or use them both at the same time—a fundamental discovery for scientists who believe such bacteria played a role in the evolution of life on Earth.

New Technology for New Exploration of Hydrothermal Vents

Advances in undersea imaging systems, the development of new vehicles and instruments, and improved seafloor mapping capabilities have enabled scientists to explore areas of the deep sea in unprecedented detail.

Diving to the Rosebud Vents - Galápagos Rift

In 2002, researchers diving in the submersible Alvin returned to the Galápagos Rift, a mid-ocean ridge about 250 miles from the Galápagos Islands in the eastern Pacific Ocean where hydrothermal vents and exotic organisms were first found in 1977.

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