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News Releases

1-18 of 18 results

Steve Elgar Named National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellow

Steve Elgar, a senior scientist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), has been selected as a 2016 National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellow (NSSEFF) by the Department of Defense.

Study Reveals Climate Change Impacts on Buzzards Bay

An analysis of long-term, water quality monitoring data reveals that climate change is already having an impact on ecosystems in the coastal waters of Buzzards Bay, Mass. These impacts relate to how nitrogen pollution affects coastal ecosystems.

Study Reveals How Rivers Regulate Global Carbon Cycle

Scientists from WHOI calculated the first direct estimate of how much and in what form organic carbon is exported to the ocean by rivers.

WHOI Receives $150,000 Grant from Tower Foundation

The Peter and Elizabeth C. Tower Foundation has awarded the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) a $150,000 grant that will help fund a three-year collaborative project with Cape Abilities—a nonprofit organization dedicated to finding good jobs for Cape Cod residents with disabilities.

WHOI Scientists Receive $1 Million Grant from MacArthur Foundation

WHOI scientists have received a $1 million grant from The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation to develop science-based climate change adaptation solutions for coastal communities.

Study Offers Economical Solutions for Maintaining Critical Delta Environments

A new study by WHOI geologist Liviu Giosan and his colleagues documents the historic sediment record along the Danube River delta, and offers simple and inexpensive strategies to enhance deltas's natural ability to trap sediment and maintain their floodplains against rising sea levels and increasingly frequent and severe storms.

Climate Change Led to Collapse of Ancient Indus Civilization, Study Finds

A new study combining the latest archaeological evidence with state-of-the-art geoscience technologies provides evidence that climate change was a key ingredient in the collapse of the great Indus or Harappan Civilization almost 4000 years ago. The study, led by WHOI geologist Liviu Giosan, also resolves a long-standing debate over the source and fate of the Sarasvati, the sacred river of Hindu mythology.

Long-Term Carbon Storage in Ganges Basin May Portend Global Warming Worsening

Global warming could destabilize the pool of carbon in the Ganges-Brahmaputra basin and similar places on Earth, potentially increasing the rate of CO2 release into the atmosphere.

Researchers from WHOI and MBL Receive $1.2 Million Grant for Collaborative Salt-Marsh Study

Scientists from WHOI and the Marine Biological Laboratory were awarded a $1.2 million NSF collaborative grant for studies on the role of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in salt marsh nitrogen and carbon cycling. The fieldwork will be conducted at the Plum Island Ecosystem Long-Term Ecological Research site on Boston's North Shore.

Study Assesses Nations' Vulnerabilities to Reduced Mollusk Harvests from Ocean Acidification

Changes in ocean chemistry due to increased carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are expected to damage shellfish populations around the world, but some nations will feel the impacts much sooner and more intensely than others, according to a study by scientists at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI).

Nauset Marsh Estuary Red Tide Study to Begin

A three-year study into the cause of local area red tides is set to begin March 21.  A team of researchers from the National Park Service, U.S. Geological Survey, and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution will be examining the cause of red tides in the Nauset Marsh Estuary and its embayments in Cape Cod, Mass.

Danube Delta Holds Answers to Noah's Flood Debate

Did a catastrophic flood of biblical proportions drown the shores of the Black Sea 9,500 years ago, wiping out early Neolithic settlements around its perimeter? A geologist with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and two Romanian colleagues report in the January issue of Quaternary Science Reviews that, if the flood occurred at all, it was much smaller than previously proposed by other researchers.

Ice-Covered Arctic Lakes May Harbor Signs of Climate Change

Arctic coastal environments are some of the most vulnerable to climate change. A team of WHOI researchers visited Canada’s Mackenzie River Delta in April 2007 to find out just how vulnerable.

Buried, Residual Oil is Still Affecting Wildlife Decades After a Spill

Nearly four decades after a fuel oil spill polluted the beaches of Cape Cod, researchers have found the first compelling evidence for lingering, chronic biological effects on a marsh that otherwise appears to have recovered.

Researchers Find Substantial Amount of Mercury Entering the Ocean through Groundwater

New pathway for pollution may change views of how much mercury is lingering in coastal waters.

Is U.S. Marine Aquaculture Economically Sustainable?

With growing global populations and ever-increasing demands for seafood, fish farms are expected to expand significantly over the next few decades. But is aquaculture economically sustainable?

Rerouting of Major Rivers in Asia Provides Clues to Mountains of the Past

Scientists use lab techniques and sediment cores from the ocean to help explain how rivers have changed course over millions of years.

Freshwater and Saltwater Interactions in Coastal Groundwater Systems May Provide Clues to Chemicals Entering Coastal Waters

Scientists have recently recognized an imbalance in the flow of salty groundwater into the coastal ocean. The timing of that flow may be key to the health of coastal waters.

1-18 of 18 results