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Monster hurricanes reached U.S. during prehistoric periods of ocean warming

A new study of prehistoric hurricanes shows the intensity and frequency of hurricanes the U.S. could experience could intensify as ocean temperatures increase with climate change.

Study Supplies Insight into Behavior of African Monsoon

In a study published this week in Nature Geoscience, a team of researchers provides new insight into the behavior of the African monsoon at the end of the African Humid Period and the factors that caused it to collapse.

Evidence Suggests California's Drought is the Worst in 1,200 Years

As California finally experiences the arrival of a rain-bearing Pineapple Express this week, two climate scientists from the University of Minnesota and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution have shown that the drought of 2012-2014 has been the worst in 1,200 years.

WHOI Announces 2013 Ocean Science Journalism Fellows

Ten science reporters, writers, and multimedia journalists from the U.S., Canada, and India have been selected to participate in the competitive Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) Ocean Science Journalism Fellowship program. The program takes place September 8-13, 2013, in Woods Hole, Mass., on Cape Cod.

Scientists Explore Roots of Future Tropical Rainfall

How will rainfall patterns across the tropical Indian and Pacific regions change in a future warming world? Climate models generally suggest that the tropics as a whole will get wetter, but the models don’t always agree on where rainfall patterns will shift in particular regions within the tropics.

The Black Sea is a Goldmine of Ancient Genetic Data

When Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) marine paleoecologist Marco Coolen was mining through vast amounts of genetic data from the Black Sea sediment record, he was amazed about the variety of past plankton species that left behind their genetic makeup (i.e., the plankton paleome).

Human Impact Felt on Black Sea Long Before Industrial Era

WHOI geologist Liviu Giosan and an international team of collaborators including environmental engineers, modelers, paleogeographers, and paleobiologists have pieced together a unique history of the Danube River delta and watershed that ultimately provides evidence for a transformative impact of humans on the Black Sea over hundreds, if not thousands of years.

Climate Change Led to Collapse of Ancient Indus Civilization, Study Finds

A new study combining the latest archaeological evidence with state-of-the-art geoscience technologies provides evidence that climate change was a key ingredient in the collapse of the great Indus or Harappan Civilization almost 4000 years ago. The study, led by WHOI geologist Liviu Giosan, also resolves a long-standing debate over the source and fate of the Sarasvati, the sacred river of Hindu mythology.

Study Links Major Shifts in Indian Civilizations to Past Changes in Monsoon

A fundamental shift in the Indian monsoon has occurred over the last few millennia, from a steady humid monsoon that favored lush vegetation to extended periods of drought, reports a new study led by researchers at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. The study has implications for our understanding of the monsoon’s response to climate change.

New Coral Dating Method Hints at Possible Future Sea-Level Changes

New evidence of sea-level oscillations during a warm period that started about 125,000 years ago raises the possibility of a similar scenario if the planet continues its more recent warming trend, says a research team led by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI).

New Temperature Reconstruction from Indo-Pacific Warm Pool

A new 2,000-year-long reconstruction of sea surface temperatures (SST) from the Indo-Pacific warm pool (IPWP) suggests that temperatures in the region may have been as warm during the Medieval Warm Period as they are today.

Extinction of Neanderthals Was Not a Climate Disaster Scenario

Scientists have offered several competing theories for what led to the extinction of the Neanderthals, with much of the debate focusing on the relative roles of climate change versus conflict with modern humans. New research shows that Neanderthals did not die out at a time of extreme and sudden climatic change, as some researchers have suggested.

WHOI Geologists Compile Longest Ever Record of Atlantic Hurricane Strikes

The frequency of intense hurricanes in the Atlantic Ocean appears to be closely connected to long-term trends in the El Niño/Southern Oscillation and the African monsoon, according to new research from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI). Geologists Jeff Donnelly and Jonathan Woodruff made that discovery while assembling the longest-ever record of hurricane strikes in the Atlantic basin.

Ice-Covered Arctic Lakes May Harbor Signs of Climate Change

Arctic coastal environments are some of the most vulnerable to climate change. A team of WHOI researchers visited Canada’s Mackenzie River Delta in April 2007 to find out just how vulnerable.

Climate Change in the Bottom of a Lake

Climate is often discussed in global terms, but it is the regional and local effects that will matter most to everyday people.

Linking Climate Change Across Time Scales

Scientists have found links in global variations in temperature that may provide insight to the bigger picture of climate change.

Warmer than a Hot Tub: Atlantic Ocean Temperatures Much Higher in the Past

Scientists have found evidence that tropical Atlantic Ocean temperatures may have once reached 107°F, about 25°F higher than ocean temperatures today and warmer than a hot tub. While these high ocean temperatures occurred millions of year ago, the new study suggests climate models underestimate future warming.

Fine-tuning the Steps in the Intricate Climate Change Dance

New scientific findings are strengthening the case that rapid climate change may be related to how vigorously ocean currents move heat between low and high latitude.

New Coral Dating Technique Helps Resolve Changes in Sea Level Rise in the Past

Corals from Papua New Guinea and Barbados indicate that changes in sea level, one of the key indexes for global climate change, may have been more frequent in the past than previously thought.

Changes in Earth's Tilt Control When Glacial Cycles End

Scientists have long debated what causes glacial cycles, which have occurred most recently at intervals of about 100,000 years. A new study finds that these glacial cycles are paced by variations in the tilt of Earth’s axis, and that glaciations end when Earth's tilt is large.

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