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News Releases

1-14 of 14 results

Swansea University Professor Receives Prestigious Fulbright Award to Study at WHOI

David Lamb, a professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Swansea University in Wales, will conduct research at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) as part of an All Disciplines Scholar Fulbright Award—one of the most prestigious and selective scholarship programs operating worldwide.

SharkCam Tracks Great Whites into the Deep

On the first trip to study great white sharks in the wild off Guadalupe Island in 2013, the REMUS SharkCam team returned with an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) tattooed with bite marks and some of the most dramatic footage ever seen on Discovery Channel's Shark Week: large great white sharks attacking the underwater robot, revealing previously unknown details about strategies sharks use to hunt and interact with their prey.

Robotic Vehicles Offer a New Tool in Study of Shark Behavior

THe REMUS SharkCam has enabled groundbreaking scientific understanding of great white sharks.

WHOI, NEAQ Embark on Expedition to the Phoenix Islands

A research team led by the New England Aquarium (NEAQ) and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) are heading out on a 6,000-mile expedition to one of the most remote places on Earth—the Phoenix Islands in the central Pacific Ocean. Throughout the month of September and in the midst of a strengthening Pacific El Nino, researchers will investigate the combined effects of climate change and human activity on the these vast coral reef ecosystems and the diversity of life they sustain. 

REMUS SharkCam Captures Upclose Encounters with Great Whites

When a team from WHOI took a specially equipped REMUS SharkCam underwater vehicle to Guadalupe Island in Mexico to film great white sharks in the wild, they captured more than they bargained for.

Tags Reveal Chilean Devil Rays Are Among Ocean's Deepest Divers

Thought to dwell mostly near the ocean's surface, Chilean devil rays (Mobula tarapacana) are most often seen gliding through shallow, warm waters. But a new study by scientists at WHOI and international colleagues reveals that these large and majestic creatures are actually among the deepest-diving ocean animals.

New Study Finds Extreme Longevity in White Sharks

Great white sharks—top predators throughout the world's ocean—grow much slower and live significantly longer than previously thought, according to a new study led by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI).

Summer Shark Research Heats Up at WHOI

White shark tagging expedition sets sail (July 31), Discovery Channel Shark Week segment "The Return of Jaws" features WHOI's REMUS technology (Aug. 5), and WHOI scientists and engineers share latest research at Woods Hole public event (Aug. 7)

Tracking Fish Through a Coral Reef Seascape

Ocean scientists have long known that juvenile coral reef fishes use coastal seagrass and mangrove habitats as nurseries, later moving as adults onto coral reefs. But the fishes’ movements, and the connections between different tropical habitats, are much more complex than previously realized, according to a study published September 3 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The findings have important implications for management and protection of coral reefs and other marine environments.

Sharks sniff out their prey, one nostril at a time

It turns out the old saying is right — the nose really does know. And when it comes to sharks, the nostrils are particularly discriminating. Combined with the ability to detect underwater vibrations, sharks are able to zero in on the location of their prey by smelling in stereo, according to a new study by researchers at the University of South Florida (USF) and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI).

You Don't Call, You Don't Write: Connectivity in Marine Fish Populations

Children of baby boomers aren’t the only ones who have taken to setting up home far from where their parents live. A new study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences documents how larval dispersal connects marine fish populations in a network of marine protected areas – information that is critical for fisheries managers.

Butterflyfish May Face Extinction

A beautiful black, white and yellow butterflyfish, much admired by eco-tourists, divers and aquarium keepers alike, may be at risk of extinction.

Innovative Tagging Technique May Help Researchers Better Protect Fish Stocks

WHOI fish ecologist Simon Thorrold has received a research grant from the David and Lucile Packard Foundation to use harmless chemical tags to track the dispersal of the larvae of coral reef fishes in the western Pacific Ocean. The unique tagging experiment will help determine if Marine Protected Areas aid in the recovery of fish stocks.

Coral Reef Fish Make Their Way Home

Coral reef fish hatchlings dispersed by ocean currents are able to make their way back to their home reefs again to spawn.

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