Public Event: Tour the Knorr

The research vessel used to discover Titanic and the hydrothermal vents

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Date

Sunday, August 7, 2011
Woods Hole Village
Tours, Lectures, Displays

Schedule of Events

SHIP TOURS on the WHOI dock (between Smith and Bigelow Buildings)
Tours begin at 11:00 a.m. The last tour leaves the gate at 2:15 p.m. 
• Visitors to the ship must have a valid photo ID.
• Tours require the ability to climb several steep flights of stairs.
• Please wear sensible shoes; no backpacks, no strollers.

PRESENTATIONS in Redfield Auditorium (45 Water Street, Woods Hole)
Beginning at 12:00 p.m. and 2:00 p.m.

Susan Avery, WHOI President and Director
Welcome and introductions

» View Dr. Avery's remarks



A.D. Colburn, Current captain of R/V Atlantis
Stories from a former Knorr captain

» View Capt. Colburn's presentation



Susan Humphris, WHOI marine geologist
The 1977 discovery of hydrothermal vents

» View Dr. Humphris' presentation



Dave Gallo, WHOI director of special projects
The 1985 discovery of the wreck of the Titanic

» View Dr. Gallo's presentation



DISPLAYS at the Ocean Science Exhibit Center
(15 School Street, Woods Hole)
11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Additional Information about Knorr from Oceanus Magazine

February 4, 2010
Into the Wild Irminger Sea
Neither 60-knot winds, 40-foot waves, nor icebergs big as buildings stayed these scientists and crew from completing their appointed mission to decipher currents pivotal to both the oceans' circulation and Earth's climate.
Source: Oceanus Magazine
June 11, 2008
Knorr Skirts Ice to Search for 'Arctic Haze'
On the ship's northern-most journey in its 39-year career, Knorr helps scientists learn how industrial chemicals are transported north and how they might contribute to warming of the Arctic region.
Source: Oceanus Magazine
March 13, 2008
Knorr Shoots the Moon (Pool) to Drill for Coral
With a removeable section of its hull opened, a WHOI-operated research vessel was temporarily transformed into an efficient shallow-water drillship.
Source: Oceanus Magazine
April 20, 2007
The Lo-o-o-ng Core
A variety of unique engineering components were needed to create a system that could take and retrieve a 150-foot core from the seabed. The research ship Knorr required a major retrofitting to accommodate the system.
Source: Oceanus Magazine
Adventure in the Labrador SeaApril 1, 1997
Adventure in the Labrador Sea
The sound of the general alarm bell reverberated through the ship. At 2:30 AM, this couldn't be a drill. Even more puzzling, we were still dockside in Halifax, four hours from our scheduled departure for the Labrador Sea.
Source: Oceanus Magazine