Pioneer Array EOM mooring with multi-function node.

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Pioneer Array EOM mooring with multi-function node.

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The EOM test buoy was deployed in January, 2010 on a mooring in 152 meters of water on the continental shelf break south of Woods Hole.
(Photo by Tim Scholz, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

Coastal Surface Electro-Optical-Mechanical (EOM) Mooring

The electro-optical-mechanical (EOM) mooring will be used at the Pioneer Array and at the Endurance Array's Washington Line offshore and shelf sites. The moorings will support sensors at the air-sea interface, on the instrument frame at the upper EOM termination at 5 m depth, and on the multifunction node (MFN) on the ocean bottom.

Enabling Technology
The enabling technology for the EOM moorings, which distinguishes the design from the Global moorings, is the incorporation of a 30 m stretch hose section. This design is optimal for shallow water applications where it is necessary to provide electrical and/or optical paths to seabed equipment while minimizing the risk of cable hockle by maintaining positive tension on the entire EOM section. The design can be tuned for water depths from 50 to 500 m.

Surface Buoy
At the top of the mooring is a surface buoy - a modular buoy design with a tall, low-drag tower and deep keel. The buoy will be approximately 6-7 m in overall height with a foam flotation section about 2.8 m in diameter. The surface buoy is equipped with the same high-power system as the Global Southern Ocean buoy. It will include a methanol fuel cell supplementing wind and solar power generators as well as energy storage in Absorbed Glass Mat (AGM) lead acid batteries.

Multi-Function Node
Coastal moorings are terminated at the seafloor by a multi-function node (MFN) that provides data and power ports for benthic instrumentation. Two of the MFNs will incoporate docking stations at their base for AUVs.