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Postdoctoral Investigator

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News Articles featuring NOSAMS clients

Old Nuclear Fallout Proves Useful for Sea Turtle Clues

Dr. Kyle Van Houtan turns to an unlikely environmental marker to better understand the life of the world’s seven marine turtle species, all but one of which are endangered.

A Survivor Comes Home

Dr. Paul Aharon and Dr. Steven Jacobs use radiocarbon dating to investigate how old a Torah rescued from the Nazis in the Czech regions of Bohemia and Moravia might be.

Specks in the Spectrometer

An atomic odyssey from the Great Calcite Belt to a data point by Sarah Rosengard and WHOI/MIT Joint Program student.

Is the 'Gospel of Jesus's Wife' a revelation or a hoax?

Harvard University professor Karen L. King with Noreen Tuross investigate a a tiny fragment of ancient Egyptian papyrus whose eight partial lines of Coptic script included one sensational half-sentence: “Jesus said to them, ‘My wife . . .’ ”

Earth's Riverine Bloodstream

MIT/WHOI joint program student Jordan Hemingway unlocks clues to how our planet works by studying rivers.

River Buries Permafrost Carbon at Sea

NOSAMS Client Valier Galy's new study tracing the fate of carbon stored in thawing Arctic soils.

Monster hurricanes reached U.S. during prehistoric periods of ocean warming

A new study by NOSAMS' clients Jeff Donnelly and Andrea Hawkes of prehistoric hurricanes shows the intensity and frequency of hurricanes the U.S. could experience could intensify as ocean temperatures increase with climate change.

New study finds extreme longevity in white sharks

MIT/WHOI joint program student Li Ling Hamady student uses radiocarbon dating to show Great White sharks grow much slower and live significantly longer than previously thought.

Great white sharks—top predators throughout the world's ocean—grow much slower and live significantly longer than previously thought, according to a new study

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-01-extreme-longevity-white-sharks.html#jCp
Great white sharks—top predators throughout the world's ocean—grow much slower and live significantly longer than previously thought, according to a new study

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-01-extreme-longevity-white-sharks.html#jCp
Great white sharks—top predators throughout the world's ocean—grow much slower and live significantly longer than previously thought, according to a new study

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-01-extreme-longevity-white-sharks.html#jCp
Great white sharks—top predators throughout the world's ocean—grow much slower and live significantly longer than previously thought, according to a new study

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-01-extreme-longevity-white-sharks.html#jCp

What is That Sticking Out of the Sand?

Christopher Maio and Greg Berman, with a little help from NOSAMS, investigate drowned forests around Cape Cod.

Tracking Carbon in the Arctic Ocean

David Griffith, with support from NOSAMS, conducts a study to measure carbon at various depths in the Artic Ocean.

Scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) have conducted a new study to measure levels of carbon at various depths in the Arctic Ocean. - See more at: http://www.astrobio.net/topic/solar-system/earth/climate/tracking-carbon-in-the-arctic-ocean/#sthash.4HLSeU9b.dpuf

David Griffith
David Griffith
David Griffith

NOSAMS Staff Publications

NOSAMS Research Library

The NOSAMS Research Library is a searchable directory of publications written by NOSAMS staff and clients.