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News Releases

August 20, 2015

Rhode Island Oceanographer, Professor Chosen to Receive Ketchum Award for Coastal Science

The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has chosen Candace Oviatt, a professor of oceanography at the University of Rhode Island (URI), as the recipient of the 2015 Bostwick H. Ketchum Award.

August 18, 2015

Examining the Fate of Fukushima Contaminants

An international research team reports results of a three-year study of sediment samples collected offshore from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in a new paper published August 18, 2015, in the American Chemical Society's journal, Environmental Science and Technology. The research aids in understanding what happens to Fukushima contaminants after they are buried on the seafloor off coastal Japan.

August 17, 2015

New AUV Plankton Sampling System Deployed

Researchers and engineers have developed and tested an innovative new system for sampling small planktonic larvae in coastal ocean waters and understanding their distribution.

August 13, 2015

Heat Release from Stagnant Deep Sea Helped End Last Ice Age

The build-up and subsequent release of warm, stagnant water from the deep Arctic Ocean and Nordic Seas played a role in ending the last Ice Age within the Arctic region, according to new research led by an international team of scientists.

August 11, 2015

Ultrasounds for Coral Reefs?

Scientists have tested a surprisingly cheap and effective way to assess the health of vulnerable coral reefs and to monitor threats on remote atolls: eavesdropping.

August 5, 2015

River Buries Permafrost Carbon at Sea

As temperatures rise, some of the carbon dioxide stored in Arctic permafrost meets an unexpected fate—burial at sea. As many as 2.2 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) per year are swept along by a single river system into Arctic Ocean sediment, according to a new study.

August 2, 2015

Shifting Winds, Ocean Currents Doubled Endangered Galapagos Penguin Population

Shifts in trade winds and ocean currents powered a resurgence of endangered Galapagos Penguins over the past 30 years, according to a new study. These changes enlarged a cold pool of water the penguins rely on for food and breeding—an expansion that could continue as the climate changes over the coming decades, according to a new study led by researchers at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI).

July 31, 2015

Whale Research Takes Flight

A research team has successfully demonstrated a new non-invasive tool to obtain hard-to-get health measurements of large endangered whales in the wild.

July 29, 2015

John W. Farrington Named 2015 American Geophysical Union Fellow

John W. Farrington of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has been elected a fellow of the American Geophysical Union (AGU). Farrington, dean emeritus and an emeritus member in the Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry Department, is among 60 new fellows who will be honored for "exceptional scientific contributions and attained acknowledged eminence in the fields of Earth and space sciences." 

sentry with plankton sampler
July 17, 2015

’Plankzooka’ Larval Sampler May Revolutionize Deep-Ocean Research

Scientists have successfully conducted the first high-volume collection of plankton, including animal larvae, from the deep ocean using a new sampling device mounted on a robotic submarine.

opalescent pool
July 16, 2015

Carbon Dioxide Pools Discovered in Aegean Sea

The waters off Greece’s Santorini are the site of newly discovered opalescent pools forming at 250 meters depth. The interconnected series of meandering, iridescent white pools contain high concentrations of CO2 and may hold answers to questions related to deepsea carbon storage as well as provide a means of monitoring the volcano for future eruptions.

air travel map
July 13, 2015

Air Travel and Climate: A Potential New Feedback?

A new study has found a connection between climate and airline flight times, suggesting a feedback loop could exist between the carbon emissions of airplanes and our changing climate.  

July 9, 2015

WHOI Announces 2015 Ocean Science Journalism Fellows

Seven writers and multimedia science journalists from the U.S. have been selected to participate in the competitive WHOI Ocean Science Journalism Fellowship program, September 13-18, 2015.

nature cover
July 8, 2015

Where Iron and Water Mix

New research proves that the dissolved metals from hydrothermal plumes follow deep-sea currents to provide a major source of iron to the world's oceans.

July 7, 2015

Deep-Sea Images Give New View of Arctic Ocean Methane Seeps

WHOI scientists and colleagues from the Centre for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Environment and Climate in Norway collected nearly 30,000 high definition images at known methane release sites in the Arctic Ocean. The detailed images will provide new insights into the most remote areas of natural methane releases in the world.

charity navigator logo
July 7, 2015

WHOI Earns 4-Star Rating from Charity Navigator

Sound fiscal management practices and commitment to accountability and transparency have earned WHOI a 4-star rating from Charity Navigator, America’s largest independent charity evaluator.

 

Mark Abbott
June 30, 2015

WHOI Names Mark Abbott President and Director

Mark Abbott has been named WHOI's tenth president and director. Abbott will assume the office October 1, 2015, succeeding Susan Avery, who served from 2008 to 2015.

June 25, 2015

Camera's Eye Sees Large Numbers of Young Scallops Off Delaware Bay

NOAA researchers and colleagues from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) have reported what appears to be a banner year for young sea scallops off the Delmarva Peninsula in mid-Atlantic waters of the U.S.

June 24, 2015

Anna Michel Receives Gulf Research Program Early-Career Research Fellowship

WHOI assistant scientist Anna Michel was chosen by the National Academy of Sciences to receive a 2015 Gulf Research Program Early-Career Research Fellowship.

map of area off New Jersey
June 11, 2015

Accelerated Warming of the Continental Shelf Off Northeast Coast

Water temperatures along the continental shelf off New Jersey have experienced unprecedented warming over the last 13 years.

IGT
June 8, 2015

Making Organic Molecules in Hydrothermal Vents in the Absence of Life

A new study is the first to show that methane formation does not occur during the relatively quick fluid circulation process.

June 5, 2015

Diverse Corals Persist, But Bioerosion Escalates in Palau's Low-pH Waters

As the ocean absorbs atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) released by the burning of fossil fuels, its chemistry is changing, lowering its pH in a process known as ocean acidification. This process also removes carbonate ions, an essential ingredient needed by corals and other organisms to build their skeletons and shells.

 

cap and gown
June 4, 2015

Dr. John Holdren to Give 2015 Joint Program Commencement Address

Dr. John Holdren, President Obama’s science advisor, will present the commencement address at this year’s graduation ceremonies of the MIT/WHOI Joint Program in Oceanography/Applied Ocean Science and Engineering.

streams from helicopter
June 3, 2015

Sudden Draining of Glacial Lakes Explained

Scientists have found a surprising mechanism that triggers the abrupt draining of glacial lakes atop the Greenland Ice Sheet.

May 26, 2015

Deep Sea Explorations Come to Life in Extraordinary New Book

WHOI scientists Daniel Fornari and Timothy Shank and their colleagues Jeff Karson (Syracuse Univ.), Deborah Kelley (U. Washington) and Michael Perfit (U. Florida) bring their deep-sea explorations to the public with an extraordinary new book, “Discovering the Deep: A Photographic Atlas of the Sea-Floor and Ocean Crust. 

May 18, 2015

WHOI Scientist Hyodae Seo Receives 2015 Young Investigator Award

The Office of Naval Research (ONR) has selected Hyodae Seo, an associate scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), to receive a 2015 Young Investigator Award from the U.S. Navy.

May 14, 2015

Revealing the Ocean's Hidden Fertilizer

Phosphorus is one of the most common substances on Earth. An essential nutrient for every living organism—humans require approximately 700 milligrams per day—we are rarely concerned about consuming enough of it because it is present in most of the foods we eat. Despite its ubiquity and living organisms' utter dependence on it, we know surprisingly little about how it moves, or cycles, through the ocean environment.

illustration
May 13, 2015

Study Reveals How Rivers Regulate Global Carbon Cycle

Scientists from WHOI calculated the first direct estimate of how much and in what form organic carbon is exported to the ocean by rivers.

ESP test on dock
May 11, 2015

Gulf of Maine Red Tide Bloom Expected to Be Similar to Past Three Years

New England’s spring and summer red tides will be similar in extent to those of the past three years, according to the 2015 Gulf of Maine red tide seasonal forecast.

May 6, 2015

Securing the Supply of Sea Scallops for Today and Tomorrow

Good management has brought the $559 million United States sea scallop fishery back from the brink of collapse over the past 20 years. However, its current fishery management plan does not account for longer-term environmental change like ocean warming and acidification that may affect the fishery in the future. A group of researchers from WHOI, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service, and Ocean Conservancy hope to change that. 

April 27, 2015

Ocean Bacteria Get 'Pumped Up'

Scientists have discovered a surprising new short-circuit to the biological pump. Sinking particles of stressed and dying phytoplankton release chemicals that can have a jolting, steroid-like effect on marine bacteria feeding on the particles.

April 13, 2015

Coexisting in a Sea of Competition

Diversity of life abounds on Earth, and there's no need to look any farther than the ocean's surface for proof. There are over 200,000 species of phytoplankton alone, and all of those species of microscopic marine plants that form the base of the marine food web need the same basic resources to grow—light and nutrients.

map of west coast
April 6, 2015

Trace Amounts of Fukushima Radioactivity Detected Along Shoreline of British Columbia

Scientists at WHOI have for the first time detected the presence of small amounts of radioactivity from the 2011 Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in a seawater sample from the shoreline of North America.

April 1, 2015

WHOI Receives $150,000 Grant from Tower Foundation

The Peter and Elizabeth C. Tower Foundation has awarded the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) a $150,000 grant that will help fund a three-year collaborative project with Cape Abilities—a nonprofit organization dedicated to finding good jobs for Cape Cod residents with disabilities.

March 26, 2015

Swirling Currents Deliver Phytoplankton Carbon to Ocean Depths

Just as crocus and daffodil blossoms signal renewal and the start of a warmer season on land, a similar "greening" event—a massive phytoplankton bloom—unfolds each spring in the Atlantic Ocean from Bermuda to the Arctic.  But, what happens to all that organic material produced in the surface ocean?

cyndy chandler
March 25, 2015

Chandler Elected Co-Chair of International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange

Cyndy Chandler, an Information Systems Specialist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), has been elected to serve a two-year term as co-chair of the International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange (IODE). Established in 1961, the IODE is part of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) of UNESCO.

alvin underwater
March 10, 2015

Research Submersible Alvin Completes Depth Certification to 4500 Meters

The submersible Alvin has achieved certification from the U. S. Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) for operations to its rated depth of 4,500 meters (approx. 2.8 miles).

SOS screen grab
March 2, 2015

New Museum Program Focuses on Impacts of Fukushima on the Ocean

On the fourth anniversary of the disaster, WHOI and the Aquarium of the Pacific debut a new program about ocean radioactivity motivated by the Fukushima nuclear accident.

February 24, 2015

Neel Aluru Receives Outstanding New Environmental Scientist Award

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Assistant Scientist Neel Aluru has received an Outstanding New Environmental Scientist award from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. 

hurricane destroyed house
February 11, 2015

Monster hurricanes reached U.S. during prehistoric periods of ocean warming

A new study of prehistoric hurricanes shows the intensity and frequency of hurricanes the U.S. could experience could intensify as ocean temperatures increase with climate change.

February 5, 2015

WHOI Scientists Featured in 'Women in Oceanography: A Decade Later'

Thirteen scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) are featured in the new publication "Women in Oceanography: A Decade Later," which reviews the progress made over the last 10 years in addressing barriers to career advancement for female oceanographers.

February 2, 2015

Study Supplies Insight into Behavior of African Monsoon

In a study published this week in Nature Geoscience, a team of researchers provides new insight into the behavior of the African monsoon at the end of the African Humid Period and the factors that caused it to collapse.

February 2, 2015

Study Finds Deep Ocean is Source of Dissolved Iron in Central Pacific

A new study led by scientists at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) points to the deep ocean as a major source of dissolved iron in the central Pacific Ocean.

January 26, 2015

Researchers Produce Two Biofuels from a Single Algae

A common algae commercially grown to make fish food holds promise as a source for both biodiesel and jet fuel, according to a new study published in the journal Energy & Fuels.

January 7, 2015

Coral Reefs Threatened by a Deadly Combination of Changing Ocean Conditions

A new study shows exposing corals to added nutrients increases their erosion and dissolution rate tenfold.