spacer
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution


spacer
Publications
»Sc.D. Thesis
»Recirculation gyres in a beta-plane jet
»Forcing and sampling of ocean models
»Thermohaline circulation - sea ice feedback
»Recirculation forced by an unstable jet
»Tidal dissipation over rough topography
»Dynamics of ocean heat transport variability
»Deep ocean currents from GRACE
»Estimates of tidally-driven mixing
»Millennial climate variability
»Oceanic eddy heat transport
»Ocean heat content from GRACE
»Tidally-driven mixing in an ocean model
»Ocean bathymetry and Earth's climate
»Bathymetry from space
»Subtropical mode water during KESS
»North Atlantic Ocean circulation from GRACE
»Subtropical mode water in the Kuroshio Extension
»Tidal mixing during the Last Glacial Maximum
»Kuroshio northern recirculation gyre
»Bottom pressure in KESS and GRACE
»Ocean model metrics
»Abyssal mixing in CCSM
»Kuroshio Extension jet and transport
»The Morphology of Steve


spacer
Rainville, L., S. R. Jayne, J. L. McClean, and M. E. Maltrud , Formation of subtropical mode water in a high-resolution ocean simulation of the Kuroshio Extension region , Ocean Modelling, 2007

A high-resolution numerical model is used to examine the formation and variability of the North Pacific Subtropical Mode Water (STMW) over a 3-year period. The STMW distribution is found to be highly variable in both space and time, a characteristic often unexplored because of sparse observations or the use of coarse resolution simulations. Its distribution is highly dependent on eddies, and where it was renewed during the previous winter. Although the potential vorticity fluxes associated with down-front winds can be of the same order of magnitude or even greater than the diabatic ones due to air–sea temperature differences, the latter dominate the potential vorticity budget on regional and larger scales. Air–sea fluxes, however, are dominated by a few strong wind events, emphasizing the importance of short time scales in the formation of mode waters. In the Kuroshio Extension region, both advection and mixing play important roles to remove the STMW from the formation region.

FILE » Rainville_2007.pdf



© Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
All rights reserved