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Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Juan Pablo Canales

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Publications
»41. R2K Advances in Seismic Imaging
Oceanography, 2012

»40. R2K Seismic Studies
Oceanography, 2012

»39. Melt bodies off the EPR
Nature Geoscience, 2012

»38. JdF Plate: Gravity structure
G-cubed, 2011

»37. JdF Plate: Layer 2B structure
G-cubed, 2011

»36. Kane waveform tomography
GRL, 2010

»35. Kane Oceanic Core Complex
G-cubed, 2009

»34. Geophysical signatures of oceanic core complexes
GJI, 2009

»33. Accretion of the lower crust
Nature, 2009

»32. Faulting of the Juan de Fuca plate
EPSL, 2009
»31. Axial topography os the Galapagos Spreading Center
G-cubed, 2008

»30. Juan de Fuca Ridge flanks
G-cubed, 2008

»29. Seismic structure of oceanic core complexes
G-cubed, 2008

»28. Juan de Fuca Ridge: structure and hotspots
G-cubed, 2008

»27. Structure of the TAG segment, Mid-Atlantic Ridge
G-cubed, 2007

»26. Detachment faulting at TAG, Mid-Atlantic Ridge
Geology, 2007

»25. Structure of the Endeavour segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge
JGR, 2007

»24. Magma beneath Lucky Strike Hydrothermal Field
Nature, 2006

»23. Magma chamber of the Cleft segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge
EPSL, 2006

»22. Topography and magmatism at the Juan de Fuca Ridge
Geology, 2006

»21. Structure of the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge
JGR, 2005

»20. Sub-crustal magma lenses
Nature, 2005

»19. Constructing the crust at the Galapagos Spreading Center
JGR, 2004

»18. Atlantis core complex
EPSL, 2004

»17. Morphology of the Galapagos Spreading Center
G-cubed, 2003

»16. Crustal structure of the East Pacific Rise
GJI, 2003

»15. Plume-ridge interaction along the Galapagos Spreading Center
G-cubed, 2002

»14. Compensation of the Galapagos swell
EPSL, 2002

»13. Structure of Tenerife, Canary Islands
JVGR, 2000

»12. Underplating in the Canary Islands
JVGR, 2000

»11. Structure of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MARK, 23?20'N)
JGR, 2000

»10. Structure of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (35?N)
JGR, 2000

»9. Structure of Gran Canaria, Canary Islands
J. Geodyn., 1999

»8. Structure of overlapping spreading centers in the MELT area
GRL, 1998

»7. Crustal thickness in the MELT area
Science, 1998

»6. The MELT experiment
Science, 1998

»5. The Canary Islands swell
GJI, 1998

»4. Morphology of the Galapagos Spreading Center
JGR, 1997

»3. Faulting of slow-spreading oceanic crust
Geology, 1997

»2. Flexure beneath Tenerife, Canary Islands
EPSL, 1997

»1. Elastic thickness in the Canary Islands
GRL, 1994



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Nedimovic, M.R., D.R. Bohnenstiehl, S.M. Carbotte, J.P. Canales, R.P. Dziak, Faulting nad hydration of the Juan de Fuca plate system, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 284, 94-102, 2009

Abstract

Multichannel seismic observations provide the first direct images of crustal scale normal faults within the Juan de Fuca plate system and indicate that brittle deformation extends up to ~200 km seaward of the Cascadia trench. Within the sedimentary layering steeply dipping faults are identified by stratigraphic offsets, with maximum throws of 110±10 m found near the trench. Fault throws diminish both upsection and seaward from the trench. Long-term throw rates are estimated to be 13±2 mm/kyr. Faulted offsets within the sedimentary layering are typically linked to larger offset scarps in the basement topography, suggesting reactivation of the normal fault systems formed at the spreading center. Imaged reflections within the gabbroic igneous crust indicate swallowing fault dips at depth. These reflections require local alteration to producean impedance contrast, indicating that the imaged fault structures provide pathways for fluid transport and hydration. As the depth extent of imaged faulting within this young and sediment insulated oceanic plate is primarily limited to approximately Moho depths, fault-controlled hydration appears to be largely restricted to crustal levels. If dehydration embrittlement is an important mechanism for triggering intermediate-depth earthquakes within the subducting slab, then the limited occurrence rate and magnitude of intraslab seismicity atthe Cascadia margin may in part be explained by the limited amount of water imbedded into the uppermost oceanic mantle prior to subduction. The distribution of submarine earthquakes within the Juan de Fuca plate system indicates that propagator wake areas are likely to be more faulted and therefore more hydrated than other parts of this plate system. However, being largely restricted to crustal levels, this localized increase in hydration generally does not appear to have a measurable effect on the intraslab seismicity along most of the subducted propagator wakes at the Cascadia margin.



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