Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Juan Pablo Canales

»55. Sonar imaging of the Rainbow area
G3, 2016

»54. Structure of the Juan de Fuca Plate
JGR, 2016

»53. Bending faults offshore Cascadia
JGR, 2016

»52. Tectonics of the Rainbow area
G3, 2015

»51. Melt distribution along the EPR
GJI, 2015

»50. EPR Multi-sill plumbing system
Nature Geoscience, 2014

»49. Galapagos Spreading Center: Tomography
AGU Monograph, 2014

»48. Axial Volcano
Geology, 2014

»47. Melt-Mush along the EPR
JGR, 2014

»46. EPR Moho in 3D
G-cubed, 2014

»45. Melt bodies off the EPR
EPSL, 2014

»44. EPR Magma segmentation
Nature Geoscience, 2013

»43. TAG 3D P-wave velocity
G-cubed, 2012

»42. Atlantis core complex
G-cubed, 2012

»41. R2K Advances in Seismic Imaging
Oceanography, 2012

»40. R2K Seismic Studies
Oceanography, 2012

»39. Melt bodies off the EPR
Nature Geoscience, 2012

»38. JdF Plate: Gravity structure
G-cubed, 2011

»37. JdF Plate: Layer 2B structure
G-cubed, 2011

»36. Kane waveform tomography
GRL, 2010

»35. Kane Oceanic Core Complex
G-cubed, 2009

»34. Geophysical signatures of oceanic core complexes
GJI, 2009

»33. Accretion of the lower crust
Nature, 2009

»32. Faulting of the Juan de Fuca plate
EPSL, 2009

»31. Axial topography os the Galapagos Spreading Center
G-cubed, 2008

»30. Juan de Fuca Ridge flanks
G-cubed, 2008

»29. Seismic structure of oceanic core complexes
G-cubed, 2008

»28. Juan de Fuca Ridge: structure and hotspots
G-cubed, 2008

»27. Structure of the TAG segment, Mid-Atlantic Ridge
G-cubed, 2007

»26. Detachment faulting at TAG, Mid-Atlantic Ridge
Geology, 2007

»25. Structure of the Endeavour segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge
JGR, 2007

»24. Magma beneath Lucky Strike Hydrothermal Field
Nature, 2006

»23. Magma chamber of the Cleft segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge
EPSL, 2006

»22. Topography and magmatism at the Juan de Fuca Ridge
Geology, 2006

»21. Structure of the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge
JGR, 2005

»20. Sub-crustal magma lenses
Nature, 2005

»19. Constructing the crust at the Galapagos Spreading Center
JGR, 2004

»18. Atlantis core complex
EPSL, 2004

»17. Morphology of the Galapagos Spreading Center
G-cubed, 2003

»16. Crustal structure of the East Pacific Rise
GJI, 2003

»15. Plume-ridge interaction along the Galapagos Spreading Center
G-cubed, 2002

»14. Compensation of the Galapagos swell
EPSL, 2002

»13. Structure of Tenerife, Canary Islands
JVGR, 2000

»12. Underplating in the Canary Islands
JVGR, 2000

»11. Structure of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MARK, 23?20'N)
JGR, 2000

»10. Structure of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (35?N)
JGR, 2000

»9. Structure of Gran Canaria, Canary Islands
J. Geodyn., 1999

»8. Structure of overlapping spreading centers in the MELT area
GRL, 1998

»7. Crustal thickness in the MELT area
Science, 1998

»6. The MELT experiment
Science, 1998

»5. The Canary Islands swell
GJI, 1998

»4. Morphology of the Galapagos Spreading Center
JGR, 1997

»3. Faulting of slow-spreading oceanic crust
Geology, 1997

»2. Flexure beneath Tenerife, Canary Islands
EPSL, 1997

»1. Elastic thickness in the Canary Islands
GRL, 1994

Marjanović, M., H. Carton, S.M. Carbotte, M.R. Nedimović, J.C. Mutter, and J.P Canales, Distribution of melt along the East Pacific Rise from 9°30’ to 10°N from an amplitude variation with angle of incidence (AVA) technique, Geophys. J. int., 203, 1-21, 2015

We examine along-axis variations in melt content of the axial magma lens (AML) beneath the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise (EPR) using an amplitude variation with angle of incidence (AVA) crossplotting method applied to multichannel seismic data acquired in 2008. The AVA crossplotting method, which has been developed for and, so far, applied for hydrocarbon prospection in sediments, is for the first time applied to a hardrock environment.We focus our analysis on 2-D data collected along the EPR axis from 9 29.8 N to 9 58.4 N, a region which encompasses the sites of two well-documented submarine volcanic eruptions (1991–1992 and 2005–2006). AVA crossplotting is performed for a 53 km length of the EPR spanning nine individual AML segments (ranging in length from 3.2 to 8.5 km) previously identified from the geometry of the AML and disruptions in continuity. Our detailed analyses conducted at 62.5 m interval show that within most of the analysed segments melt content varies at spatial scales much smaller (a few hundred of metres) than the length of the fine-scale AML segments, suggesting high heterogeneity in melt concentration. At the time of our survey, about 2 yr after the eruption, our results indicate that the three AML segments that directly underlie the 2005–2006 lava flow are on average mostly molten. However, detailed analysis at finer-scale intervals for these three segments reveals AML pockets (from > 62.5 to 812.5 m long) with a low melt fraction. The longest such mushy section is centred beneath the main eruption site at 9 50.4 N, possibly reflecting a region of primary melt drainage during the 2005–2006 event. The complex geometry of fluid flow pathways within the crust above the AML and the different response times of fluid flow and venting to eruption and magma reservoir replenishment may contribute to the poor spatial correlation between incidence of hydrothermal vents and presence of highly molten AML. The presented results are an important step forward in our ability to resolve small-scale characteristics of the AML and recommend the AVA crossplotting as a tool for examining mid-ocean ridge magma-systems elsewhere.


© Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
All rights reserved