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Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Elizabeth B. Kujawinski

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Publications
»Using stable isotope probing to characterize differences between free-living and sediment-associated microorganisms in the subsurface.
»DOM in Lake Superior
»Deepwater Horizon hydrocarbons in the marine environment
»Microbes and marine DOM, Ann. Rev. Mar. Sci. 2011
»Greenland ice sheet outlet glacier: Insights from a new isotope-mixing model
»Groundwater DOM, GCA 2011
»Dispersants & DWH, ES&T 2011
»FT-MS variability in DOM, Org Geochem 2010
»Predatory Flavobacteria, FEMS Microb Ecol 2010
»Greenland Ice Sheet DOM, GCA 2010
»Protozoa and bacteria in aquifers, FEMS Microb Ecol, 2009
»Source markers in DOM, GCA 2009
»Automated data analysis, Anal. Chem. 2006
»Marine DOM and ESI FT-ICR MS; Marine Chem 2004
»DOM extraction by C18; Org. Geochem. 2003
»Black carbon by ESI FT-ICR MS; ES&T 2004
»ESI FT-ICR MS review; Env. Forensics 2002
»Marine protozoan surfactants; Marine Chem. 2002
»ESI MS and NOM; Org. Geochem. 2002
»ESI FT-ICR MS & humic acids; Anal. Chem. 2002
»Protozoan DOM & PCBs; ES&T 2001
»Protozoa & Fe, Th, C; Aquat. Microb. Ecol. 2001
»PCB uptake by protozoa; AEM 2000


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Kujawinski E. B., M. C. Kido Soule, D. L. Valentine, A. K. Boysen, K. Longnecker, and M. C. Redmond, Fate of dispersants associated with the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, Environmental Science & Technology, 45: 1298-1306. 2011

Response actions to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill included the injection of 771,000 gallons (2,900,000 L) of chemical dispersant into the flow of oil near the seafloor. Prior to this incident, no deepwater applications of dispersant had been conducted, and thus no data exist on the environmental fate of dispersants in deepwater. We used ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) to identify and quantify one key ingredient of the dispersant, the anionic surfactant DOSS (dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate), in the Gulf of Mexico deepwater during active flow and again after flow had ceased. Here we show that DOSS was sequestered in deepwater hydrocarbon plumes at 1000−1200 m water depth and did not intermingle with surface dispersant applications. Further, its concentration distribution was consistent with conservative transport and dilution at depth and it persisted up to 300 km from the well, 64 days after deepwater dispersant applications ceased. We conclude that DOSS was selectively associated with the oil and gas phases in the deepwater plume, yet underwent negligible, or slow, rates of biodegradation in the affected waters. These results provide important constraints on accurate modeling of the deepwater plume and critical geochemical contexts for future toxicological studies. The article is available from Environmental Science & Technology here.

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