Please note: You are viewing the unstyled version of this website. Either your browser does not support CSS (cascading style sheets) or it has been disabled. Skip navigation.

Coastal

  Email    Print  PDF  Change text to small (default) Change text to medium Change text to large

 
    First Previous Pause Next Last
Slideshow speed: 5 seconds
 
Move
  • CICOR Summer Student Fellow, Tess Brandon, with Remus.
    Get a Grip
    Working at the WHOI dock, CICOR summer student fellow Tess Brandon (Cornell University) and WHOI engineering assistant Amy Kukulya prepare a REMUS autonomous underwater vehicle for a research trip out to the waters off Martha's Vineyard. Working with physical oceanographer and CICOR Fellow Al Plueddemann, Brandon studied the hydrodynamics of a submarine sand ridge and now works at NOAA's National Oceanographic Data Center in the Satellite Oceanography Group.(Photo by Tom Kleindinst, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution) (Photo by Tom Kleindinst, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)
  • Deck hand Ian Hanley secures equipment on R/V Tioga
    Secure that Line
    Deck hand Ian Hanley secures equipment on R/V Tioga during attempted right whale tagging off Georges Bank with CICOR Fellow, biologist Mark Baumgartner. (Photo by Amy Nevala, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution) (Photo by Amy Nevala, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)
  • HAB Model of Northeast Coast
    WHOI scientists Dennis McGillicuddy (left) and Ruoying He deploy a drifter to observe the flow of currents around the Bay of Fundy during a May 2005 cruise on the research vessel Oceanus. The devices were built by Jim Manning of the U.S. National Marine Fisheries Service to track the movement of water in the Gulf of Maine, where the harmful algae Alexandrium fundyense are widely distributed. (Photo by Mike Carlowicz, WHOI) (Photo by Mike Carlowicz, WHOI)
  • computer simulation of the historic 2005 toxic algae bloom in New England
    WHOI scientists Dennis McGillicuddy and Ruoying He created a computer simulation of the historic 2005 toxic algae bloom in New England. Red denotes high algae concentrations; blue the lowest. Algal cells germinated from cyst beds in the Bay of Fundy and along the Maine coast. They were swept south and west by currents. McGillicuddy and He entered a range of factors into their model: the speeds and directions of ocean currents, water temperature and salinity, winds, surface heat exchanges, tides, river runoff, and the distribution and behavior of cells in the water and in seafloor sediments. (Data visualization by Ruoying He and Dennis McGillicuddy, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution) (Data visualization by Ruoying He and Dennis McGillicuddy, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)
  • null
    Hunting for Whales' Water
    CICOR Fellow Mark Baumgartner and Melissa Patrician repair a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) rosette on the coastal research vessel Tioga. The biologists use the CTD to detect the water properties and nutrients at various depths in the ocean to see how they correlate with the depths to which whales dive. Baumgartner and colleagues are trying to understand the conditions that not only cause whales to dive within an area, but to migrate to the region in the first place. (Photo by Amy Nevala, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution) (Photo by Amy Nevala, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

CICOR Summer Student Fellow, Tess Brandon, with Remus.
 
 
CICOR Research Theme: The Coastal Ocean and Near Shore Processes
Coastal waters are important for reasons that include weather, national defense, shipping, fishing, human health, coastal hazards, and mineral extraction. NOAA’s mandate to bring its resources to bear on the protection and management of these waters and related ecosystems has never been more important. Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution offers a range of collaborative opportunities, that include:
  • Dr. Di Jin’s analysis has quantified the economic impact of a recent Red Tide event.  The Marine Policy Center, of which he is a member, actively works at the intersection of natural science research with the economic and policy studies that translate oceanographic findings into practical outcomes.
  • The Woods Hole Oceanographic has a range of facilities that can be used cooperatively with NOAA researchers, including the Martha’s Vineyard Coastal Observatory, both large and small research vessels, and specialized laboratories.
  • Woods Hole scientists have long been leaders in understanding currents and water properties in estuaries and over the continental shelf. These waters are increasingly important because of the dramatic anthropogenic effects often found there. WHOI approaches include the observations, theory and modeling, as well as their intersections.
  • Shoreline change, on time scales ranging from hours to centuries, is a major research focus. Studies range from understanding the mechanics of sediment transport to studying sedimentary records in order to obtain detailed historical records of hurricanes.


» View Projects




Last updated: August 19, 2008
 


whoi logo

Copyright ©2007 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, All Rights Reserved, Privacy Policy.
Problems or questions about the site, please contact webdev@whoi.edu